China trade war triggers closings, layoffs at US hardwood lumber mills

China trade war triggers closings, layoffs at US hardwood lumber mills

It is hard times for the U.S. hardwood lumber industry. The trade war with China has caused a steep drop in U.S. exports of the product, and now the industry is cutting jobs.

China used to account for about half of all U.S. hardwood lumber exports, about $2 billion annually. The Trump administration’s 25% tariff cut through that demand.

In the 12 months since tariffs on U.S. hardwood were announced in July of last year, lumber exports to China were down $615 million compared with the previous year, according to the American Hardwood Export Council. In June of this year alone, when the full tariff rate went into effect, trade volume to China was half what it was a year ago.

“The American hardwood industry is facing a watershed moment in China. As political and commercial ties between our two countries continue to deteriorate, our industry is caught in the middle of a fight with a country who has been our largest market for a decade,” wrote Tripp Pryor, international program manager at the council, in an August report. “The real long-term danger here is that we are losing market share that will not easily be won back.”

Hardwood is used for things like flooring, furniture, cabinets and doors, while softwood is used in framing and other building materials go nhua ngoai troi.

Workers at Northwest Hardwoods’ mill in Mount Vernon, Washington, don’t have much time left on the job. The mill is set to be shuttered in November, and all 70 jobs gone. The Tacoma, Washington-based company, which is one of the largest producers in North America, is also closing a plant in Virginia, cutting an additional 30 jobs, and is then laying off 30 more at the corporate level.

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